Call for attorneys to grade moot court written briefs



The Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at American University
Washington College of Law invites all attorneys interested in
international law to participate as a judge in the Ninth Annual
Inter-American Human Rights Moot Court Competition, taking place May
23-28, 2004.  This unique Competition aims to familiarize students with
the jurisprudence created by the organs of the Inter-American system for
the promotion and protection of human rights as well as to promote
interaction and exchanges among students, academics, diplomats and
practitioners.  Equally important, the week-long Competition helps a new
generation of lawyers understand the importance of respecting divergent
opinions, intellectual rigor and the values that underpin the discourse of
human rights.

Volunteering as a judge gives you the opportunity to participate in a
unique training and mentoring program of students from around the world.
Last year, 45 teams from 14 different countries participated in the
Competition, involving over 150 students and faculty. Over 70 volunteer
attorneys participated in the Competition, grading written briefs,
questioning students in over 50 oral round sessions, welcoming students on
visits to their organizations, and speaking at the Competitionís training
seminar.

The Competition also provides you with a wonderful opportunity to network
with other accomplished attorneys, diplomats and judges. Whether it is
prior to grading an oral round session or at one of the many receptions
held during the week of the Competition, many excellent opportunities
exist where you can meet other attorneys interested in international human
rights law.

Finally, the Competition offers you the opportunity to explore
cutting-edge legal issues currently being considered both in the
Inter-American system and international legal frameworks. This yearís
hypothetical case explores the contentious issues surrounding a
governmentís desire to exploit natural resources underneath land populated
by groups of indigenous peoples. The case illuminates the critical tension
between economic development and indigenous rights.

If you are committed to international law and human rights, you will
surely enjoy participating as a judge in this competition. Judges can
grade the written memorials (submitted April 15th) and/or the oral round
sessions during the week of the Competition. Either way, your
participation is critical in sustaining the long-term impact of human
rights education in the Americas as well as in supporting the months of
preparation undertaken by nearly 100 young lawyers who will join us in
Washington, DC for the Competition.

To volunteer as a judge, please fill out a judge registration form online
at www.wcl.american.edu/humright/mcourt/2004/registration.cfm or contact
Shazia Anwar at (202)274-4180 or iamoot@wcl.american.edu.  Thank you.



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